"E PLURIBUS UNUM" out of many, one
"E PLURIBUS UNUM" out of many, one Mexico/France/USA/Spain
Good teachers, leaders, and speakers don’t see themselves as experts with passive audiences they need to impress. Nor do they view their interests as most important. Instead, they see themselves as guides and focus on helping others learn.

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If you don’t go after what you want, you’ll never have it. If you don’t ask, the answer is always no. If you don’t step forward, you’re always in the same place.
Nora Roberts  (via coyotegold)

(Source: observando, via qdancetran)

audreyheckburn:

History Meme: 1/5 Assassinations

  • The Assassination of Caligula

There are few surviving sources on Caligula’s reign, although he is described as a noble and moderate ruler during the first six months of his rule. After this, the sources focus upon his cruelty, extravagance and sexual perversity, presenting him as an insane tyrant. While the reliability of these sources has increasingly been called into question, it is known that during his brief reign, Caligula worked to increase the unconstrained personal power of the emperor (as opposed to countervailing powers within the principate). He directed much of his attention to ambitious construction projects and notoriously luxurious dwellings for himself. However, he initiated the construction of two new aqueducts in Rome: the Aqua Claudia and the Anio Novus. During his reign, the Empire annexed the Kingdom of Mauretania and made it into a province.

In early 41 AD, Caligula became the first Roman emperor to be assassinated, the result of a conspiracy involving officers of the Praetorian Guard, as well as members of the Roman Senate and of the imperial court. The conspirators’ attempt to use the opportunity to restore the Roman Republic was thwarted: on the same day the Praetorian Guard declared Caligula’s uncle Claudius emperor in his place.

(Source: raybolger)

audreyheckburn:

History Meme: 1/1 War

  • The Trojan War

In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus king of Sparta. The war is one of the most important events in Greek mythology and has been narrated through many works of Greek literature, most notably through Homer’s Iliad and the Odyssey. The Iliad relates a part of the last year of the siege of Troy; the Odyssey describes Odysseus’s journey home. Other parts of the war are described in a cycle of epic poems, which have survived through fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets including Virgil and Ovid.

The war originated from a quarrel between the goddesses Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite, after Eris, the goddess of strife and discord, gave them a golden apple, sometimes known as the Apple of Discord, marked “for the fairest”. Zeus sent the goddesses to Paris, who judged that Aphrodite, as the “fairest”, should receive the apple. In exchange, Aphrodite made Helen, the most beautiful of all women and wife of Menelaus, fall in love with Paris, who took her to Troy. Agamemnon, king of Mycenae and the brother of Helen’s husband Menelaus, led an expedition of Achaean troops to Troy and besieged the city for ten years because of Paris’ insult. After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse. The Achaeans slaughtered the Trojans (except for some of the women and children whom they kept or sold as slaves) and desecrated the temples, thus earning the gods’ wrath. Few of the Achaeans returned safely to their homes and many founded colonies in distant shores. The Romans later traced their origin to Aeneas, one of the Trojans, who was said to have led the surviving Trojans to modern-day Italy.

The ancient Greeks thought that the Trojan War was a historical event that had taken place in the 13th or 12th century BC, and believed that Troy was located in modern-day Turkey near the Dardanelles. By modern times, both the war and the city were widely believed to be non-historical. In 1868, however, the German archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann met Frank Calvert, who convinced Schliemann that Troy was at Hissarlik and Schliemann took over Calvert’s excavations on property belonging to Calvert; this claim is now accepted by most scholars. Whether there is any historical reality behind the Trojan War is an open question. Many scholars believe that there is a historical core to the tale, though this may simply mean that the Homeric stories are a fusion of various tales of sieges and expeditions by Mycenaean Greeks during the Bronze Age. Those who believe that the stories of the Trojan War are derived from a specific historical conflict usually date it to the 12th or 11th centuries BC, often preferring the dates given by Eratosthenes, 1194–1184 BC, which roughly corresponds with archaeological evidence of a catastrophic burning of Troy VIIa.

(Source: raybolger)

oliviapopes:

history meme | 1/1 wars: the war of 1812

The War of 1812 was a war fought between the British Empire and the United States of America. It lasted two years and eight months, but ended without any territorial change. Among the reasons for war were the British employing impressment, the British supporting the Indians in their attacks on the Americans and the British impeding American trade with the French. The Americans swiftly identified the province of Upper Canada (later Ontario) as their easiest target. Lower Canada (later Quebec) was remote and protected by the city of Quebec. The Maritimes were well defended by the British Navy. As an added bonus, the British were greatly outnumbered by the Americans, as most of the British army were off fighting Napoleon. However, the British were well prepared under the control of Isaac Brock and took control of Michigan and Upper Mississippi. The British troops were greatly aided by the First Nations. The British then won at the Battle of Queenston Heights (October 13th, 1812), but Isaac Brock was killed. After Brock’s death, the British employed a new strategy: they went on the defense, compared to Brock’s ideas of attacking quickly. However, in May of 1813, the Americans struck back with the capture of Fort George. This was the low point of the war for the British Empire, as the Americans has also captured York (later Toronto) earlier in the year for a short period of time. On June 5th, at the Battle of Stoney Creek, the British took back Fort George. Worn down, the Americans left Canada. The next year (1814 if you’re keeping up), the Americans easily captured Fort Erie in July. Over in the Maritimes, the British took over most of the coast of Maine. The Americans left Fort Erie after a several month long standoff, but not before destroying it. This effectively ended the American time in Upper Canada. On December 24th, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent was signed in Ghent, Belgium, with the Russians as mediators. Unfortunately, communication was slow back in 1814, and news of the peace treaty did not reach North America until after a decisive American victory in New Orleans. Although it is debatable, Canadians consider the war a win, as they did not lose any territory to the Americans.

unstvlish:

rewhore:

unkemptly:

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unstvlish:

rewhore:

unkemptly:

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Only a
Mother Is
God
In the eyes
of a
Child